Are Wirehaired Pointing Griffons Hypoallergenic?

Absolutely! Being one of the lowest hair-shedding dogs on the planet, this pooch is the ultimate companion for allergy sufferers.

 

The Hypoallergenic Wirehaired Pointing Griffon

 

Let me put a naughty rumor to rest!

Despite what you may read elsewhere, the Wirehaired Pointing Griffon isn’t non-shedding. That would make it a complete freak of nature. All dogs — in fact, all animals with fur — shed to some extent.

However, what is true is that these pooches lose remarkably less fur than most other dogs — perhaps the lowest amount of all canines. And hence — as poochie hair is one of the main causes of pet intolerance — this makes the Pointing Griffon wonderfully hypoallergenic!

What’s more, the wiry coats of these dogs retain their dander — the discarded dead skin cells that can also send you into coughing and sneezing fits. A quick brush once a week to remove this detritus (wearing gloves if you’re particularly sensitive) and your Pointing Griffon will be allergen-free!

And, if you want another allergy-busting bonus — these fur babies don’t drool or slobber!

Many pet owners’ physiologies react badly to the proteins in canine saliva — overstimulating the inflammatory response and then causing itching and rashes. But as the Pointing Griffon isn’t going to drench you or your home with spit, your allergies are kept at bay!

 

Wirehaired pointing griffon running

By CarolPtak – CC BY-SA 4.0

 

About the Wirehaired Pointing Griffon

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Back in the mid-to-late 1800s, the upper classes of Continental Europe were obsessed with shooting game. As such, dog breeders competed with each other to create the ultimate gun dog.

The problem was that, while one pooch may have excelled at pointing, it was invariably useless at retrieving — and vice versa. Meaning that these sportsmen needed to take more than one type of dog with them on their shoots.

That was until Eduard Karel Korthals, from the Netherlands, bred the Wirehaired Pointing Griffon in 1873.

Through selective crossing of numerous breeds, he developed a pooch that could hunt, point and retrieve — even from the water, with its webbed feet!

While today the Pointing Griffon is found in many homes as a companion dog, it is still the ‘go-to’ pooch for hunting.

This dog entered the registry books of the AKC in 1887.

 

Characteristics of the Wirehaired Pointing Griffon

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If you were kind, you’d probably describe the Pointing Griffon as rugged and robust. Or, if you were to be a little more honest, you’d say this pooch looks scruffy, unkempt, and bedraggled.

While it does have some noble features — such as its elegant mustache, round eyes, and square head — it’s this pooch’s rough appearance that is particularly characteristic.

Its outer coat is hard, coarse, wiry, and bristly, with a fine undercoat — it’s the canine equivalent of ‘bed hair.’ Trust me, there’s little point trying to coiffure its fur into any particular style, or even attempting to make it tidy. It would be an exercise in futility.

That’s not to say you can completely forget about Wirehaired Pointing Griffon grooming sessions — it still needs weekly brushing to remove any trapped detritus or dander. But this is an excellent pooch for those pet parents who like the more ‘natural’ look.

Typical colors of the coat include:

  • Steel gray
  • Steel gray and brown (chestnut brown and roan)
  • White and brown
  • White and orange
  • Brown
  • Tan
  • White
  • White and orange
  • Black (but not accepted by the kennel club)

The Wirehaired Pointing Griffon size is 20-24 inches and it weighs 35-70 pounds.

Wirehaired pointing griffon showroom

By Canarian – CC BY-SA 4.0 

 

Wirehaired Pointing Griffon Temperament

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While considered by many experts to be the ultimate gun dog, the Pointing Griffon is also an excellent addition to the family.

Tremendously outgoing, eager to please and completely trustworthy — they’re excellent around children and other animals. Not at all aggressive, they love to play both in and out of the home.

Unlike many gun dogs, they don’t take well to kennel life. These are pooches that need to be in your home and with their pet parents. They can develop a massive bond with their family — but not to the extent of showing jealousy toward other humans or animals.

 

Training and Exercise

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Despite being over a century since the Wirehaired Pointing Griffon was first bred as a gun dog, its desire to be out in the field hasn’t changed.

Hence, ideally, these pooches are happiest when out hunting for game and waterfowl.

However, if you’re not into these outdoor pursuits, that doesn’t mean the Pointing Griffon isn’t for you. But you will need to ensure you meet its inherent training and exercise requirements.

These doggies are incredibly fast learners and respond well to training. Although, being sensitive, they don’t take well to harsh instruction. 

They can live in an apartment, but that’s far from ideal. In perfect circumstances, they should have an outdoor yard or garden (or preferably a field!) in which to release their pent up energy. You see, these pooches need exercise. Lots of it, in fact.

At the very least, you should take your Pointing Griffon outside for activity sessions for at least 1 to 1.5 hours per day. And, just having a steady walk isn’t sufficient. They will need time off the leash, to chase, play, and retrieve.

The exercise requirements for the Pointing Griffon are as much about expending energy as mental stimulation. Lacking in either, these pooches become bored, depressed, and destructive.

Hence, only consider this pooch if you have the time, dedication, and inclination to give him the attention he deserves and needs.

 

Wirehaired Pointing Griffon Health Issues

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Compared to many purebreds, the Pointing Griffon is incredibly healthy, with few inherent genetic issues. Furthermore, they have a lengthy lifespan, typically of 12-15 years.

There are a small number of problems to watch out for — these are, primarily:

Wirehaired pointing griffon standing

By Pets Adviser from Brooklyn – CC BY 2.0

 

Conclusion

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The Wirehaired Pointing Griffon is a lively, affectionate, devoted, and enthusiastic pooch, who will make a fun-loving addition to the family.

Incredibly low-shedding, they’re perhaps one of the most hypoallergenic doggies on the planet.

But remember, this is a true gun dog.

If you’re not a sportsperson, and don’t have the time to devote to daily stimulating exercise, this isn’t the companion for you. Instead, consider one of the other, less high-maintenance, hypoallergenic pooches.

 

Wirehaired Pointing Griffon FAQs

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Do Wirehaired Pointing Griffons Shed?

 

Yes, but probably less than any other canine. The Wirehaired Pointing Griffon shedding levels are remarkably low — making them one of the best hypoallergenic pooches.

Furthermore, they produce little dander — and the small amount that is shed will remain trapped in the wiry coat of the Pointing Griffon.

 

What Kind of Dog As Good As it Gets?

 

The 1997 movie, As Good As It Gets, starring Jack Nicholson and Helen Hunt, featured a Brussels Griffon called Jill.

 

Are Wirehaired Pointing Griffons Smart?

 

Incredibly. Fast on the uptake and eager to please, they are easily trainable. However, use positive reinforcement when teaching, not harsh correction. Being sensitive doggies, rough treatment will be counterproductive.

 

How Long do Wirehaired Pointing Griffons Live?

 

The typical lifespan of a Wirehaired Pointing Griffon is 12-15 years.

 

How Much Does a Wirehaired Pointing Griffon Cost?

 

The average price of a Wirehaired Pointing Griffon is around $1500. A pooch with a superior pedigree can cost over $5000.

 

Wirehaired Pointing Griffon Fact Summary

 

Breed Wirehaired Pointing Griffon 
Other Names Griffon D’arr̻t, Korthals Griffon, Griffon d’arrêt à poil dur Korthals, French Wirehaired Korthals Pointing Griffon, French Wirehaired Pointing Griffon, Dutch Pointing Griffon.
Height  Male: 22-24 inches (55.8-60.9 cm)

Female: 20-22 inches (50.8-55.8 cm)

Weight Male: 50-70 pounds (22.6-31.7 kg)

Female: 35-50 pounds (15.8-22.6 kg)

Lifespan 12-15 years
Temperament Intelligent, loyal, quick-witted, loving, enthusiastic, proud, vigilant, tenacious, reliable, and devoted.
Colors Steel gray, steel gray and brown (chestnut brown, roan), white and brown, white and orange, brown, tan, white, and black.
Coat The coat is medium length, coarse, harsh, and wiry, with a fine, downy undercoat. Overall, this breed has a shaggy and unkempt appearance.
How much grooming? Little. A brush through once a week is sufficient to remove any trapped detritus and dander.
How much shedding Incredibly low shedding
Dander levels Low 
Saliva – Do they Drool or Lick much? Low – it’s not a breed known to drool or slobber
Energy levels High
How much exercise do they need? Requires at least 1-1.5 hours of vigorous exercise every day in order to maintain health, happiness and an even temperament. Walking isn’t sufficient, some games are essential to keep the Griffon mentally active.
Health problems Usually very healthy, but can suffer from hip dysplasia, otitis externa, ectropion, and entropion. 
Good for an apartment? Not ideally. This dog needs an outdoor area in which to romp and play, in addition to its daily walks and games.
Suitable for kids? Yes. They love children, and are known to be playful, energetic, and affectionate around them.
How much do they bark? Only when excited, or trying to capture your attention.
Can they be left alone? No. These doggies need companionship. They should become part of your everyday life accompanying you wherever you go. They can suffer from separation anxiety if left alone for too long, and may develop a destructive nature.
Intelligent? Yes
Trainable? Easy to train as they are eager to please — but avoid harsh correction.
How popular as a pet? They are ranked 65th out of 195 breeds by the AKC. Furthermore, the Wirehaired Pointing Griffon hypoallergenic nature makes them very popular with allergy sufferers.
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